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HISTORIC

HEWLETT-PACKARD HOUSE AND GARAGE

INFO

PROJECT INFORMATION

CLIENT: Hewlett-Packard Company
LOCATION: 367 Addison Avenue, Palo Alto, California
SIZE: 3,200 Square Feet
COST: $2,700,000

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Known as the "Birthplace of the Silicon Valley," this unassuming home in Palo Alto is where two friends, David Packard and Bill Hewlett, founded what was to become a global powerhouse, Hewlett-Packard Company. The modest garage at the rear of the property was where they prototyped the audio oscillator, the company's first product. Listed in 1989 as a California Landmark, the property bore little resemblance to the home Hewlett and Packard occupied back in 1938. Several awkward additions had been added and the defining front porch had been infilled. HP purchased the property and commissioned CAW architects to renovate the house, an important symbol of the high tech giant's humble beginnings

CAW worked with HP's corporate archivist to uncover photographs and oral histories of the founders in order to determine what the property looked like in 1938, its period of historical significance. Web postings each week kept the whole company apprised of the progress, and newspapers all over the world reported on the completed project. Tour buses of tourists flocked to the construction fence to watch the renovation take shape.

HOW CAW DID THIS

  • After developing a renovation plan for the property and receiving approval from the Historic Resources Board, CAW was able to begin construction early in order to meet HP's tough completion deadline for the project.
  • Using archived photographs that documented the many changes to the structure, CAW was able to identify what the project looked like in 1938. For instance, a rooftop dormer was seen in older photographs but had since disappeared. Fortunately, the missing window and dormer were found stored in the attic, and so could be built back into the structure.
  • The architects incorporated new energy-efficient mechanical systems throughout the building, and employed permeable concrete to make the new driveway.
  • CAW carefully restored key features of the house such as the clinker brick chimney, which was dismantled brick by brick and then reassembled after a structural frame was inserted to stabilize the chimney.

KEY PARTICIPANTS

STRUCTURAL: Degenkolb Engineers, www.degenkolb.com
CONTRACTOR: Rudolf & Sletten, www.rsconstruction.com

HISTORIC

HEWLETT-PACKARD HOUSE AND GARAGE

INFO

PROJECT INFORMATION

CLIENT: Hewlett-Packard Company
LOCATION: 367 Addison Avenue, Palo Alto, California
SIZE: 3,200 Square Feet
COST: $2,700,000

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Known as the "Birthplace of the Silicon Valley," this unassuming home in Palo Alto is where two friends, David Packard and Bill Hewlett, founded what was to become a global powerhouse, Hewlett-Packard Company. The modest garage at the rear of the property was where they prototyped the audio oscillator, the company's first product. Listed in 1989 as a California Landmark, the property bore little resemblance to the home Hewlett and Packard occupied back in 1938. Several awkward additions had been added and the defining front porch had been infilled. HP purchased the property and commissioned CAW architects to renovate the house, an important symbol of the high tech giant's humble beginnings

CAW worked with HP's corporate archivist to uncover photographs and oral histories of the founders in order to determine what the property looked like in 1938, its period of historical significance. Web postings each week kept the whole company apprised of the progress, and newspapers all over the world reported on the completed project. Tour buses of tourists flocked to the construction fence to watch the renovation take shape.

HOW CAW DID THIS

  • After developing a renovation plan for the property and receiving approval from the Historic Resources Board, CAW was able to begin construction early in order to meet HP's tough completion deadline for the project.
  • Using archived photographs that documented the many changes to the structure, CAW was able to identify what the project looked like in 1938. For instance, a rooftop dormer was seen in older photographs but had since disappeared. Fortunately, the missing window and dormer were found stored in the attic, and so could be built back into the structure.
  • The architects incorporated new energy-efficient mechanical systems throughout the building, and employed permeable concrete to make the new driveway.
  • CAW carefully restored key features of the house such as the clinker brick chimney, which was dismantled brick by brick and then reassembled after a structural frame was inserted to stabilize the chimney.

KEY PARTICIPANTS

STRUCTURAL: Degenkolb Engineers, www.degenkolb.com
CONTRACTOR: Rudolf & Sletten, www.rsconstruction.com

HISTORIC > HEWLETT-PACKARD HOUSE AND GARAGE



  • PROJECT INFORMATION

    CLIENT: Hewlett-Packard Company
    LOCATION: 367 Addison Avenue, Palo Alto, California
    SIZE: 3,200 Square Feet
    COST: $2,700,000

    PROJECT DESCRIPTION

    Known as the "Birthplace of the Silicon Valley," this unassuming home in Palo Alto is where two friends, David Packard and Bill Hewlett, founded what was to become a global powerhouse, Hewlett-Packard Company. The modest garage at the rear of the property was where they prototyped the audio oscillator, the company's first product. Listed in 1989 as a California Landmark, the property bore little resemblance to the home Hewlett and Packard occupied back in 1938. Several awkward additions had been added and the defining front porch had been infilled. HP purchased the property and commissioned CAW architects to renovate the house, an important symbol of the high tech giant's humble beginnings

    CAW worked with HP's corporate archivist to uncover photographs and oral histories of the founders in order to determine what the property looked like in 1938, its period of historical significance. Web postings each week kept the whole company apprised of the progress, and newspapers all over the world reported on the completed project. Tour buses of tourists flocked to the construction fence to watch the renovation take shape.

    HOW CAW DID THIS

    • After developing a renovation plan for the property and receiving approval from the Historic Resources Board, CAW was able to begin construction early in order to meet HP's tough completion deadline for the project.
    • Using archived photographs that documented the many changes to the structure, CAW was able to identify what the project looked like in 1938. For instance, a rooftop dormer was seen in older photographs but had since disappeared. Fortunately, the missing window and dormer were found stored in the attic, and so could be built back into the structure.
    • The architects incorporated new energy-efficient mechanical systems throughout the building, and employed permeable concrete to make the new driveway.
    • CAW carefully restored key features of the house such as the clinker brick chimney, which was dismantled brick by brick and then reassembled after a structural frame was inserted to stabilize the chimney.

    KEY PARTICIPANTS

    STRUCTURAL: Degenkolb Engineers, www.degenkolb.com
    CONTRACTOR: Rudolf & Sletten, www.rsconstruction.com